Document Type

Article

Department/Program

Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Publication Date

2014

Journal

MARINE AND COASTAL FISHERIES

Volume

6

Issue

1

First Page

108

Last Page

118

Abstract

Observation of animal movements on small spatial scales provides a means to understand how large-scale species distributions are established from individual behavioral decisions. Small-scale vertical movements of 14 Summer Flounder Paralichthys dentatus residing in Chesapeake Bay were observed by using depth data collected with archival tags. A generalized linear mixed model was employed to examine the relationship between these vertical movements and environmental covariates such as tidal state, time of day, lunar phase, and temperature. Vertical movements increased with warming water temperatures, and this pattern was most apparent at night and during rising and falling tides. Fish generally exhibited greater vertical movements at night, but the difference between vertical movements in the day and those at night decreased as fish increased in size. Results from this study fill a void in understanding the small-scale movements of Summer Flounder and could be incorporated into individual-based models to investigate how species distributions develop in response to environmental conditions.

DOI

10.1080/19425120.2014.893468

Keywords

PARALICHTHYS-DENTATUS; ULTRASONIC TELEMETRY; CHESAPEAKE BAY; BLUEFIN TUNA; DYNAMICS; FISH; CONSUMPTION; METABOLISM; SALINITY; BEHAVIOR

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Share

COinS