Document Type

Report

Department/Program

Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Publication Date

3-1988

Series

Educational series; no. 32

Abstract

Field trips should be integral "learning from life" interactive experiences which are much more than accessory enrichment activities or frills. Field trips illustrate, expand upon and extend concepts and skills learned in the classroom and laboratory. For younger students, field trips may be ends in themselves, while in older students, the trip may be a means to an end. Older students benefit from the stimulation of a nontraditional experience such as a field trip in learning new concepts and practicing techniques (Falk and Balling, 1980; Falk, Martin and Balling, 1978).

A marine education field trip can range from exploring a pond on the school grounds to a weeklong canoe trip through an estuary and its tributaries. Where you go and what you do depends on the age and maturity of your students, subject matter and school policy.

To a classroom teacher, logistical problems and time-consuming authorization procedures may mean few or no field trips. If trips are permitted, restrictions on distance may be imposed and justification required. Therefore, teachers must make any enrichment trip or alternative experience demonstrably accomplish objectives not readily achieved in the classroom. The information contained in this booklet provides guidelines to-getting the most from research field trips, museum visits, resource speakers and other nontraditional experiences. iii •:

Description

Note: This material may not meet current educational standards and is presented as part of the Institute's historical publications.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.21220/V5246N

Keywords

Marine biology -- Study and teaching (Elementary); Aquatic sciences

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