Date Thesis Awarded

5-2010

Document Type

Honors Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelors of Science (BS)

Department

Psychology

Advisor

John B. Nezlek

Committee Member

Todd Thrash

Committee Member

Matthew C. Haug

Abstract

At the onset of the study, participants provided measures of their social support, familiarity with the environment, and emotionality. Participants then entered data daily for 2 weeks about their daily mood and the events that occurred each day. A series of multilevel random coefficient modeling analyses found that daily negative events co-varied with measures of negative affect and daily positive events co-varied with measures of positive affect, self-esteem, and depression. Participants who reported higher measures of trait-level anxiety were found to have significantly lower mean levels of daily self-esteem. Both anxiety and fearfulness were found to be negatively related to BDI measures, and negatively related to positive deactive affect. Anxiety was also found to be positively related to negative active affect and negative deactive affect. Fearfulness was negatively related to positive active affect. Sentimentality was found to be positively related to daily self-esteem, BDI scores, and positive active affect. Conversely, sentimentality was found to be negatively related to both negative active and negative deactive affect. Increased social support from both family and friends leads to higher average ratings of daily self-esteem. Support from friends was negatively related to depression and daily negative deactive affect. Family support was linked to higher average ratings of positive active affect. Familiarity with the environment was found to be predictive of measures of daily well-being. Academic adjustment was positively related to daily self-esteem and depression outcomes. Social adjustment was negatively related to depression. Personal-Emotional adjustment was positively related to self-esteem and positive active and deactive affect. Conversely, Personal-Emotional adjustment was negatively related to depression and negative active and deactive affect.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

Comments

Thesis is part of Honors ETD pilot project, 2008-2013. Migrated from Dspace in 2016.

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