Document Type

Article

Department/Program

Education

Pub Date

2010

Abstract

Technologies such as micro-scopes, Bunsen burners,and balances have long been associated with learning and teaching in the science classroom. Digital technologies, such as simulations,interactive whiteboards, probeware,and Flip cameras, offer additional opportunities for science teachers to put students in charge of data generation,collection, analysis, and presentation. Yet the widespread use of even traditional technologies in science classrooms, much less newer tools, remains limited. Science teachers must choose among several technologies—for example, mercury thermometers,handheld digital thermometers, and digital temperature probes—that accomplish the same or similar tasks to assist students’ science learning. How can we best choose and integrate these tools into the science classroom?

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