Document Type

Article

Department/Program

Education

Publication Date

6-2015

Journal

High Ability Studies

Volume

26

Issue

1

First Page

39

Last Page

61

Abstract

Social coping and self-concept were explored among Irish (n = 115) and American (n = 134) grades 3–8 students. Denying one’s giftedness or the impact it has on peer relationships were associated with poor self-concept in both samples. Among Irish students, denying giftedness was associated with more positive self-concept when paired with a high activity level. Engaging in many activities in the US sample and helping one’s peers in the Irish sample were positive predictors of academic self-concept. Findings suggest young gifted students may benefit from learning more about their exceptional abilities and their impact on peers. They should also be encouraged to engage in extracurricular activities and find ways to use their exceptional abilities to support their peers.

DOI

10.1080/13598139.2015.1031881

Keywords

young gifted; social coping; self-concept; stigma of giftedness

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